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1st Ohio Cavalry

Online Books
1st Ohio Cavalry Soldier Roster - Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1866, Volume 11, by Ohio Roster Commission (Joseph B. Foraker, Governor, James S. Robinson, Sec'y of State and H. A. Axline, Adjutant-General), 1886     View Entire Book

Regimental History
First Cavalry. Cols., Owen P. Ransom, Minor Milliken, Beroth B. Eggleston ; Lieut.-Cols., Thomas C. H. Smith, James Laughlin, Valentine Cupp, Thomas J. Pattin, Stephen C. Writer; Majs., Michael W. Smith, Erasmus B. Dennison, David A. B. Moore, James N. Scott, John C. Frankeberger, William McBurney. This regiment was organized at Camp Chase from Aug. 17 to Oct. 5, 1861, to serve for three years. About the middle of September, Cos. A and C were ordered to western Virginia, whence, after performing considerable service in that department, they were ordered to the Shenandoah Valley and attached to the commands of Shields, Banks and Kilpatrick. They participated in many of the sanguinary engagements around the capital and did not return to the regiment until the spring of 1864. In December the regiment broke camp and proceeded by rail and steamboat to Louisville, being the first regiment of cavalry to enter that department. It participated in the advance upon Corinth, having frequent skirmishes with the enemy, and after the evacuation it joined in pursuit of Beauregard's army, going as far as Booneville. During this pursuit it had four sharp engagements with the enemy, but with little loss. The regiment was constantly engaged in scouting and keeping the country clear of bushwhackers and guerrillas, and a detachment sent out from Tuscumbia, Ala., had a severe engagement with Roddey's Confederate command near Russellville, and although successful suffered severely. In July Courtland was attacked by a large force of Confederate cavalry under Gen. Anderson, when two companies of the 10th Ky. infantry and Cos. E and K of the 1st Ohio cavalry engaged the enemy, holding him for a considerable time, but were compelled to retire, the enemy having captured the infantry and 21 of the cavalry. Returning to Kentucky with Buell's army, a battalion moved from Louisville in October, captured 25 prisoners in an engagement near Bardstown, and then took the advance on the Perryville road, carrying it with great gallantry. On the first day of the battle of Stone's river the regiment made a heroic charge against a foe flushed with success and continued the remaining two days until the victory was complete. On Sept. 19, 1863, the regiment arrived on the Chickamauga battle-field and was immediately led into the fight, its loss in the engagement being severe. It was then stationed at Washington, Tenn., for the purpose of guarding the Tennessee river, and while there the Confederate Gen. Wheeler, with 8,000 cavalry, broke through Gen. Crook's lines. The Confederate advance was met by a battalion of the 1st cavalry under Maj. Scott and a severe engagement followed, in which 26 men of the battalion were wounded and captured. While on a raid toward Chattanooga in November, the regiment had a severe engagement with the enemy at Cleveland, losing 15 men, but inflicting on the enemy a loss of at least 50. At Calhoun, a town on the Hiawassee river, in December, Gen. Wheeler, with 2,800 men, attacked a wagon-train and this was followed by a brisk engagement, in which the Confederates lost 25 killed, 80 wounded and 131 taken prisoners. This brilliant affair cost the cavalry but 1 man killed and 3 wounded. A sufficient number reenlisting, it became a veteran regiment and after a furlough of 30 days was back in the ranks ready for duty. In May, 1864, it crossed the Tennessee river at Decatur and three days thereafter participated in the severe engagement at Moulton, resulting in the complete defeat of Gen. Roddey, who had made an attack with a force of six regiments and a battery of artillery. The regiment lost in this engagement about 20 men killed and wounded. It then remained and acted with the main army up to and for some time after the fall of Atlanta, being employed mainly in covering the movements and protecting the flanks. When surrounded by the enemy at Lovejoy's Station the regiment particularly distinguished itself by holding in check for some time a large part of Cleburne's Confederate infantry division, with a loss of 50 men. It also took part in the movement which resulted in the evacuation of Atlanta by the Confederates. The regiment charged a 3-gun battery at Ebenezer Church, in April, 1865, and Forrest's far-famed horsemen were routed in 20 minutes. On April 2 Selma, Ala., was taken ; on the 9th the command began crossing the Alabama; on the 12 and 13th it rested in Montgomery ; took up its march on the 14th toward Columbus, Ga. ; the next day Buford's division was driven ahead ; on the 16th the advance of the regiment struck the enemy near Crawford, Ga., and charged them for 9 miles across the Ogeechee river. It was also engaged in the night assault upon Columbus, the capture of the works, the saving of the two bridges which opened up the city, its arsenals and factories, and gave as the result of one of the most desperate night assaults ever made 1,200 prisoners and 96 cannon. The regiment then garrisoned Georgia and South Carolina until mustered out Cos. A to K, inclusive, and M on Sept. 13, 1865, at Hilton Head, S. C, and Co. L on Sept. 26, 1865, at Nashville, Tenn.

Footnotes:
Regimental history taken from "The Union Army" by Federal Publishing Company, 1908 - Volume 2

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