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111th New York Infantry

Online Books:
111th New York Infantry Soldier Roster - Annual Report of the Adjutant General of the State of New York For the Year 1893, Volume 34     View the Entire Book

Regimental History
One Hundred and Eleventh New York Infantry. — Cols., Jesse Segoine, C. Dugald McDougall, Lewis W. Husk; Lieut.-Cols., Clinton D. McDougall, Seneca B. Smith, Isaac M. Lusk, Aaron P. Seeley, Lewis W. Husk, Sidney Mead; Majs., Seneca B. Smith, Isaac M. Lusk, James H. Hinnian, Lewis W. Husk. Joseph W. Corning, Sidney Mead, Reuben J. Meyers. No regiment sent out by the state saw harder service than the gallant 111th. It was organized at Auburn from companies recruited in the counties of Cayuga and Wayne, — the Twenty-fifth senatorial district — and was mustered into the U. S. service, Aug. 20, 1862. It left the city the following day for Harper's Ferry, where it had the misfortune to be surrendered with that ill-fated garrison the following month. The men were paroled at Camp Douglas, Chicago, and in Dec. 1862, were declared exchanged and went into winter quarters at Centerville, Va. Later the regiment was assigned to the 3d (Alex. Hays') brigade, Casey's division, 22nd corps, where it remained until June, 1863. Col. Fox, in his account of the three hundred fighting regiments, speaking of the 111th, says: "On June 25, 1863, the brigade joined the 2nd corps which was then marching by on its way to Gettysburg. The regiment left two companies on guard at Accotink bridge; with the remaining eight companies, numbering 390 men, it was engaged at Gettysburg on the second day of the battle, in the brilliant and successful charge of Willard's brigade, losing 58 killed, 177 wounded, and 14 missing; total, 249. The regiment did some more good fighting at the Wilderness, where it lost 42 killed, 119 wounded, and 17 missing; total, 178 — over half of its effective strength. Its casualties in the fighting around Spottsylvania amounted to 22 killed, 57 wounded, and 13 missing. From Gettysburg until the end, the regiment fought under Hancock in the 2nd corps, participating in every battle of that command. While on the Gettysburg campaign, and subsequently at Bristoe Station, Mine Run and Morton's ford, the regiment was attached to the 3d brigade, 3d division (Alex. Hayes'). Just before the Wilderness campaign it was placed in Frank's (3d) brigade, Barlow's (1st) division. This brigade was composed entirely of New York troops, the 39th, 111th, 125th, and 126th, to which were added in April, 1864, the 52nd and 57th, and later on, the 7th N. Y.; all crack fighting regiments." The regiment lost 81 killed and wounded during the final Appomattox campaign. It was mustered out near Alexandria, Va., June 3. 1865. The regiment bore an honorable part in 22 great battles. Its total enrollment during service was 1,780, of whom 10 officers and 210 men were killed and mortally wounded; its total of 220 killed and died of wounds is only exceeded by four other N. Y. regiments — the 69th, 40th, 48th and 121st — and is only exceeded by 24 other regiments in the Union armies. It lost 2 officers and 177 men by disease and other causes — total deaths, 404 — of whom 2 officers and 74 men died in Confederate prisons.

Regimental history taken from "The Union Army" by Federal Publishing Company, 1908 - Volume 2

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The 111th New York Volunteer Infantry: A Civil War History by Martin W. Husk

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