CIVIL WAR INDEX
Primary Source Material
on the Soldiers and the Battles
Home The Armies The Soldiers The Battles Civilians Articles
 
If this website has been useful to you, please consider making a Donation.

Your support will help keep this website free for everyone, and will allow us to do more research. Thank you for your support!

21st Michigan Infantry
in the American Civil War

Regimental History
Twenty-first Michigan Infantry. Cols., Ambrose A. Stevens, William H. McCreery; Lieut. -Cols., William L. Whipple, Morris B. Wells, Loomis K. Bishop; Majs., Isaac Hunting, Seymour Chase, Benton D. Fox. This regiment was organized at Ionia and was mustered in Sept. 4, 1862. It left the state Sept. 12, reported at Cincinnati, was sent to Louisville, entered upon the march through Kentucky, and was in the battle of Perryville, rendering efficient service. It reached Nashville Nov. 12, and joined the advance towards Murfreesboro, being engaged at Lavergne, Stewart's creek and at Stone's river, where it lost 17 killed, 85 wounded and 37 missing. It was with Sill's brigade, Sheridan's division, which blocked the enemy and saved the army. It remained on picket and guard duty at Murfreesboro until June, when it moved to Tullahoma, and was afterward stationed at Cowan, Anderson's station and Bridgeport. On Sept. 2, it advanced into Georgia, participated in the battle of Chickamauga, with the same brigade as at Stone's river, and was in the hottest of the fight after the breaking of the line by Longstreet. Sheridan's division was forced back, but in good order, and by a charge drove the enemy back and regained its position. Being unsupported, it was again driven back, the 21st losing 11 killed, 58 wounded, 35 missing and 3 prisoners. It was detached to form part of the engineer brigade and was engaged in that work during the engagement at Missionary ridge. It was stationed near Chattanooga until June, 1864, building a bridge and erecting storehouses. On June 11 it was ordered to Lookout mountain, engaging in building hospitals, running mills, and on picket duty. It was relieved from engineer duty in September and joined Rousseau's forces in pursuit of Forrest into Alabama. It was ordered to Chattanooga, and Dalton, Ga., in October, and received orders on Nov. 1 to join the 2nd brigade, 1st division, 14th army corps, for the march to the sea. It moved to Milledgeville, then toward Augusta, but changed its course and marched to Savannah, where the regiment was in the trenches on short rations and without covering until Dec. 18. After the evacuation it refitted for the Carolina campaign, proceeded to Sister's ferry, where it crossed the Savannah river Feb. 5, was in the engagement at Averasboro, and was heavily engaged at Bentonville, losing 92 officers and men killed and wounded out of 230. It reached Goldsboro on March 25, after a 64 days' march, with an issue of but 12 days' rations. It moved to Haywood, where it remained until Johnston's surrender and then marched to Richmond, 280 miles, in less than 8 days. It participated in the grand review at Washington and was mustered out June 8, 1865. Its original strength was 1,108: gain by recruits 369; total 1,477. Loss by death, 368.

Footnotes:
Regimental history taken from "The Union Army" by Federal Publishing Company, 1908 - Volume 3

Whats New
Bibliography
About Us


Share this page with your friends!

 


 

Copyright 2010 by CivilWarIndex.com
A Division of Pier-Pleasure.com