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4th Illinois Cavalry
in the American Civil War

Online Books:
4th Illinois Cavalry Soldier Roster - Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Illinois, Volume 7, Revised by Brigadier General J.N. Reece, Adjutant General, 1900       View Entire Book

4th Illinois Cavalry Consolidated Soldier Roster - Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Illinois, Volume 7, Revised by Brigadier General J.N. Reece, Adjutant General, 1900       View Entire Book

Regimental History
Fourth Illinois Cavalry. Cols., T. Lyle Dickey, Martin R. M. Wallace; Lieut. -Cols., William McCullough, Martin R. M. Wallace, William L. Gibson; Majs., William McCullough, Charles C. James, Martin R. M. Wallace, Samuel M. Bowman, William L. Gibson, Mindret Wemple, Charles D. Townsend. On Sept. 26, 1861, this regiment was mustered into the U. S. service for three years and soon after took up its line of march for Springfield, where it received its arms, which were not removed from their cases, however, until the command arrived at Cairo. Upon the arrival of the regiment at Cairo it went into camp upon the highest ground that could be found, where an immense amount of labor was done by the command in the way of clearing and log rolling before a decent camp could be arranged. Very shortly after getting settled Co. C was detached and sent to the Big Muddy as a bridge guard, and Co. A was detached to serve as escort to Gen. U. S. Grant, in whose service it continued until Aug., 1863. In Dec. 1861, when the reconnoissance to Columbus, Ky., was ordered, the regiment moved with the rest of the army and became the advance body, where it kept its place during the entire movement. It was slightly engaged at Fort Henry and then pursued the retreating Confederates toward Fort Donelson, meeting its first loss in the death of a private in Co. I. The regiment participated in the battles of Fort Donelson and Shiloh, in the movement on Corinth, then did guard duty in various places until Aug., 1863, when it was ordered to Vicksburg and remained at that place until the expiration of its term of service. In the latter part of Oct., 1864, that part of the regiment that had not reenlisted was ordered home to be mustered out. When the regiment left Cairo in Feb., 1862, it had about 1,100 men and when it came back to that point in 1864, it had 340 the latter being the number that were mustered out at Springfield in Nov., 1864.

Footnotes:
Regimental history taken from "The Union Army" by Federal Publishing Company, 1908 - Volume 3

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